Tag Archives: Odin Lloyd

Aaron Hernandez | Judge denies combining contempt charges for Hernandez’s cousin

tanya

FALL RIVER, Mass. –  The cousin of former Patriot Aaron Hernandez was denied a motion in court to combine charges from two different court cases, in two different counties.

Lawyers for Tanya Singleton argued the issue in court Tuesday. Singleton has been charged with criminal contempt in both Bristol and Suffolk Counties. Prosecutors say the 38-year-old refused to testify before Grand Juries in the murder of Odin Lloyd and in a 2012 double murder in Boston. Both of which Hernandez is accused of being involved in.

Earlier this month, Singleton’s lawyer indicated his client would be changing her pleas to guilty, over concerns about her battle with breast cancer.

She will be in court to change her plea in Bristol County on August 19.

Source: http://www.myfoxboston.com/

Aaron Hernandez’s Tattoos May Contain Clues to Murders

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Aaron Hernandez – hardcore drugs and about to be kicked of the team.

Aaron Hernandez

http://global.christianpost.com/news/aaron-hernandez-update-player-was-using-hardcore-drugs-on-verge-of-being-cut-from-team-103198/

Aaron Hernandez was allegedly using hardcore drugs and had long since cut ties to family and team-mates in exchange for gang members prior to his arrest for the murder of Odin Lloyd, Rolling Stone reporter Paul Solotaroff claims.

The detailed report, titled “Gansgter in the Huddle” claims that Hernandez’s life prior to his arrest for murder was far from just a New England Patriots tight end drafted in 2012. His contract with the team was extended for five years last August, but over the last year, Solotaroff alleged that Hernandez’s personality drastically changed.

After conducting detailed interviews, Solotaroff said that Hernandez had become increasingly paranoid over the past year and was actively using the hardcore drug phencyclidine, which is often shortened to PCP or called “angel dust.” The drug is known for its hallucinogenic effects and paranoia, which allegedly caused Hernandez to surround himself with gang members and cut off friends, family and teammates.

“Instead of teammates, Hernandez built a cohort of thugs, bringing stone-cold gangsters over to the house to play pool, smoke chronic and carouse,” Solotaroff wrote.

Solotaroff’s report also alleged that Hernandez had “missed so many practices” and committed so many “thug life stunts” that he was already on the verge of being cut from the team prior to the search of the player’s home. However, team owner Robert Kraft claimed he had no knowledge of Hernandez’s criminal past, describing the player as a “most likeable young man” during a Sports Illustrated interview.

Referring to Hernandez’s poor behavior as a secret that the player kept well, Kraft said “if this stuff is true, then I’ve been duped and our whole organization has been duped.”

“I never saw him with them,” John Hevesy, Hernandez’s position coach while he was on the Florida Gators, said of the alleged gang member buddies, “but misery attracts misery: There’s vultures waiting to swoop.”

Solotaroff also accused former University of Florida Coach Urban Meyer of “[helping to] cover up failed drug tests, along with two violent incidents — an assault and a drive-by shootout outside a local bar” while Hernandez was on the team.

Hernandez was formerly indicted with charges on Aug. 22 for the first-degree-murder of Odin Lloyd. The player’s arraignment has been scheduled for Sept. 6 where he will plead “guilty” or “not guilty.”

Read more at http://global.christianpost.com/news/aaron-hernandez-update-player-was-using-hardcore-drugs-on-verge-of-being-cut-from-team-103198/#t8MGxUyKpWa55iKM.99

Aaron Hernandez arraignment set fAaron Hernandezor Friday, September 6.

Aaron Hernandez

Odin Lloyd texted his sister in the wee hours of June 17.

“NFL. Just so you know.”

At the time, according to prosecutors, Lloyd was in a silver Nissan Altima with Aaron Hernandez, a star tight end with the NFL’s New England Patriots, and two other people.

About 3:25 a.m. — two minutes after the message went out — gunshots shattered the quiet night in a southeastern Massachusetts industrial park, according to witnesses.

Not five minutes passed before a surveillance camera at his North Attleborough home captured video of Hernandez carrying what appears to be a gun, prosecutors said. Lloyd lay dead about a mile away.

The video is among the evidence prosecutors are gathering in their case against Hernandez, 23, who is set to be arraigned Friday.

Let go by the Patriots, Hernandez will step into a courtroom for the sixth time since his June 26 arrest.

He’s expected to formally plead not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of Lloyd, a 27-year-old semipro football player.

“He’s bearing up under the pressure,” defense attorney Michael Fee said when Hernandez was indicted last month. “He understands what’s in front of him, and he’s committed to clearing his name.”

Fee has told reporters that the case against his client, who is being held without bond, is circumstantial. “There’s an incredible rush to judgment in this case,” according to the attorney.

For his part, according to a TMZ report last month, Hernandez declared his innocence as he responded to a fan letter, saying that “all the people who turned on me will feel like crap.”

Investigation continues in another case

Friday’s arraignment comes as authorities continue to investigate Hernandez in connection with an unsolved 2012 double homicide case in Boston.

Investigators have obtained July 2012 video surveillance allegedly showing Hernandez at a nightclub at the same time as two men who were fatally shot that night, according to a law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation.

The video apparently does not show Hernandez interacting with Daniel Abreu, 29, and Safiro Furtado, 28, according to a law enforcement source. The development was first reported Wednesday by the Hartford Courant.

Boston police have said the men were inside a BMW sprayed with gunfire after they left the nightclub.

Law enforcement sources said they believe Hernandez rented a silver SUV with Rhode Island registration that was linked to the scene of the double homicide.

After Lloyd’s murder, Bristol, Connecticut police discovered the vehicle by accident while searching the garage of Hernandez’s uncle, a law enforcement source told CNN.

Boston police had been looking for the vehicle for almost a year, law enforcement sources added.

Hernandez has not been charged in the unsolved double shooting.

His attorneys have previously declined to comment to CNN when asked about the ongoing Boston investigation.

Defense: Jury will find him ‘innocent’

A Bristol County, Massachusetts, grand jury last month indicted Hernandez on a first-degree murder and five weapons charges.

Prosecutors say Hernandez orchestrated the shooting of his friend Lloyd, who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee.

Fee said he was pleased with the indictment because it gave his client “a path to trial,” and that a jury will find Hernandez “innocent.”

Police have not located the gun believed to have been used in the Lloyd killing.

But prosecutors say Hernandez returned a rental car with a bullet casing that allegedly matched bullets found at the scene.

Surveillance cameras showed the car believed to be carrying Hernandez and the others at the industrial park, according to authorities.

Hernandez has been sitting in a jail cell as his former team, known for its stellar offense, contends for another Super Bowl title. The Patriots open their regular season Sunday against the Buffalo Bills.

In his letter to the fan, as reported by TMZ, the fallen NFL star said the world makes things “out of false accusations” and that he will be exonerated.

“I know there is a reason I’m going thru this and I will figure it out through.”

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/06/justice/aaron-hernandez-arraignment/

CNN’s Laura Dolan, Lorenzo Ferrigno, Greg Botelho and Laura Ly and HLN’s Amanda Sloane contributed to this report.

Odin Lloyd ~ His life before fatally shot, Aaron Hernandes arrested.

odin lloyd

All credits ::: http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/9440598/aaron-hernandez-odin-lloyd-connected-life-death

On a recent summer Sunday in inner-city Boston, Odin Lloyd dreamed about his future. He was at a cookout with Darryl Hodge, a friend he was so close to they called each other the Wolf Pack, a man who, like Lloyd, had boyhood hopes of playing in the NFL. But now here they were, years later, playing semipro football in empty old stadiums with beat-up bodies and paycheck-to-paycheck jobs.

Imagine, Lloyd told his friend, what life would be like if they could wake up every day doing something they loved. If they had the money to take care of everybody — family, friends — and fly anywhere they wanted on a vacation.

“I was like, ‘Bro, we know it, we’ve just got to do better overall,'” Hodge recalled. “‘Get better jobs. We should be living like that.’ That was the mission.”

They never really talked like this, Hodge said. But Lloyd was 27 years old and starting to think about these things, most likely because he was hanging out with New England Patriotstight end Aaron Hernandez.

His relationship with Hernandez had given Lloyd a glimpse of the life he’d dreamed of. Not only was Hernandez playing football for money — for millions — he was on the team Lloyd loved. Hernandez used to get him tickets to Patriots games. On at least one occasion, Hernandez, according to one of Lloyd’s friends, had dropped $10,000 on a night of clubbing with Lloyd, and of course Lloyd couldn’t believe it. Hernandez had promised Lloyd he’d fly him to California for a vacation. You’ve got to see Cali, he told him. Lloyd, who was working at a landscaping company, had never been there, Hodge said.

On the night of June 16, Lloyd was driving a shiny, black Chevy Suburban that Hernandez had rented for him. Hernandez, according to Hodge, told Lloyd he could keep it until Monday. Lloyd seemed always to be smiling, but his grin was even wider that weekend when he was behind the wheel of the SUV. Since he didn’t have a car of his own, Lloyd pedaled his bike to work. He put a positive spin on his transportation issues, figuring the extra exercise would give him an edge on the field with the semipro Boston Bandits. But then Lloyd pulled up in the Suburban that Saturday, the night the Bandits had a scrimmage, and the team was impressed. “Nice car,” they told him. Bandits assistant coach Mike Branch did a double-take. “I looked at him like, ‘Odin’ — excuse my language — ‘but whose f—ing car is that?'” Branch said.

Lloyd was star-struck — “Who wouldn’t be?” Branch said — but didn’t brag about his friendship with Hernandez. They had met sometime in the past two years through Lloyd’s girlfriend, Shaneah Jenkins, the sister of Hernandez’s fiancée, Shayanna. When someone would ask about the football player with the $40 million contract, Lloyd simply told his friends that Hernandez was a cool guy.

That night of June 16, Lloyd was supposed to watch Game 5 of the NBA Finals with Hodge. Lloyd would not root for the Miami Heat; as a Bostonian, that seemed treasonous. Sometime before the game, Lloyd’s old Blackberry jangled with a message from his boss, who said Lloyd had landscape work to do on Monday. So he grabbed some leftover barbecue and took Hodge home in the SUV.

They were about to say goodbye around 9 p.m. when Lloyd got a text. The person on the other end asked if he wanted to hang out. And then Lloyd said he might go out after all, and Hodge went home to watch the basketball game.

Days later, the barbecue Hodge’s cousin had packed up for Lloyd still sat in Lloyd’s refrigerator. “He was supposed to be at home eating,” Hodge said. “Not out and about.”

The future that Odin Lloyd dreamily talked about lasted less than 10 hours. At roughly 3:30 a.m. on June 17, Lloyd was shot five times in the chest and back. Aaron Hernandez is now sitting in the Bristol County (Mass.) House of Corrections, charged with first-degree murder and five gun-related offenses. He is being held without bail.

As the story of two men with similar dreams but completely different lives continues to unfold, all that the people close to Lloyd have are grief and questions. Why would Hernandez, who seemingly had everything, do something that would cause him to lose it all? Why, if he is guilty of killing Lloyd, would he leave the body in an industrial area less than a mile from his mansion? Why would Lloyd get into a Nissan Altima with Hernandez at roughly 2:30 a.m., only hours before he was supposed to work? Did he know he was in danger?

Mike Branch, who coached Lloyd in high school and adulthood, has been tossing and turning over these questions for more than a week.

“Those thoughts are going through my head,” Branch said. “‘Odin, if you felt fear, why did you get in the car?’

“It had to be trust, man.”