Tag Archives: murder

Police allege Gable Tostee assaulted Warriena Wright before she plunged to her death from his 14th floor apartment on the Gold Coast

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These were allegedly the last words of terrified Kiwi tourist Warriena “Rrie” Wright as she tried to flee Gold Coast playboy Gable Tostee.

The Sunday Mail has obtained exclusive details of the police case against Tostee, who faced court yesterday charged with murdering Ms Wright only hours after they met on controversial dating site Tinder.

Police will allege Ms Wright, 26, had been assaulted, was “in fear of her life” and trying to escape when she plunged to her death from the balcony of Tostee’s 14th floor apartment in the Avalon tower last Friday week.

Audio recordings of her last moments, believed to have been extracted by police technical experts from mobile phones found in a car in the building’s basement were the breakthrough detectives needed to arrest Tostee on Friday after an intensive week-long investigation.

Police will be relying on High Court findings in other cases of people fleeing in fear and dying to make the murder charge stick.

They will allege Ms Wright and Tostee met in Cavill Mall about 9pm on August 7 after connecting on Tinder and went back to his apartment.

Witnesses told police they heard a man and woman arguing and the woman screaming “No, no, no” several times and “I just want to go home” just before she plummeted to her death.

Police will allege she was trying to climb to the balcony below to escape Tostee when she fell.

CCTV footage obtained by police allegedly shows Tostee in the building foyer soon after the tragedy.

Police will allege he hid behind a pillar as police surrounded Ms Wright’s body and can be seen pacing backwards and forwards.

He then allegedly got back into the lift, rode to the basement and left the building.

CCTV cameras allegedly recorded him carrying what appeared to be a phone. Police will allege they later found three mobile phones in a car in the Avalon basement.

Tostee, who has boasted online of bedding about 150 women, handed himself in to police the day after Ms Wright’s death but refused to be interviewed.

He was arrested on Friday morning at his parents’ Carrara home, the day after a brave public plea for information by Ms Wright’s younger sister Reza.

Tostee’s parents, Gray and Helene, were not at Southport Magistrates Court yesterday to support him.

He remained in the watchhouse cells after defence lawyer Mick Purcell, a former senior police prosecutor, said he did not require his client to be brought into the dock.

People charged with murder cannot apply for bail in the Magistrates Court and Tostee was formally remanded in custody until October 10.

Outside court, Mr Purcell said his client “maintains his innocence” and he would be seeking Supreme Court bail in the coming weeks. Despite the arrest, police are still appealing for information from the public – especially women who have had interactions with Tostee.

“We’re interested in hearing from anyone who may be able to provide further information,’’ police regional crime co-ordinator Detective Superintendent Dave Hutchinson said.

“This was a particularly tragic death which pulled at the heartstrings of the community and our appeals for public help have had a very positive response.’’

Supt Hutchinson said Ms Wright’s family were relieved at the early arrest and appreciative of the police efforts.

A team of more than 50 police including Gold Coast and Brisbane Homicide Squad detectives, as well as forensics experts, worked around the clock on the investigation.

It is believed Ms Wright’s body will be flown back to New Zealand this week for a funeral.

Police are continuing to comb Tostee’s apartment for further clues.

Gable Tostee has been charged with the murder of New Zealand tourist Warriena “Rrie” Wrig

Source : http://www.couriermail.com.au/

Gerard Baden-Clay | Mistress compares herself to high profile Monica Lewinsky

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Toni McHugh likens herself to Monica Lewinsky who had an affair with Bill Clinton, previous President of the United States.  A higher title could not be possible to claim.

McHugh explained her affair with convicted wife killer, Gerard Baden-Clay in various media outlets adding to the ongoing drama since Baden-Clay was sentenced to life in prison.

Since the high profile trial played itself off in a Brisbane Court, headlines across newspapers keep raining in.

Allison Baden-Clay explained in her diary the detail of her marriage to Gerard giving the public a peak into the bitter life she led, struggling to keep her family together and to keep her children believing that they are happily married.  But behind the scenes a murderous plot was awaiting to end her successful life.

To liken yourself to Monica Lewinsky who had sexual relations with Bill Clinton makes McHugh look more foolish than when the case of just broke in 2012.

Her choice of words speak volumes, she harbour a narcissistic characteristics, excusing herself as a victim of Baden-Clay’s.  Grandiose, grand standing, putting herself above the pain others suffer and will for ever suffer.  A total disregard to the children of Allison.

So bizarre is her sudden media appearances as her message to Allison’s three daughters when she says:

“I need them to know that I’m very, very sorry for what’s happened.”

It is all about “me, myself and I”.   “I need to know”.  Why do you need to know that they get your message?  Why do they need to know only now?  You should have said that the first time you invited Gerard into your body.

Should it have happened that Baden-Clay walked out a free man, you would not have offered any apology to the daughters of Allison.  You would have taken them and turned them against their mother, as you and Baden-Clay planned your future together.

McHugh has no sorrow residing in her heart or soul, she only desires to let the money roll in, at the expense of those very three girls she now insist on hearing her self serving message.

It would have been human to ask for forgiveness rather than insist on making them KNOW you are “sorry”.  True forgiveness is asked, not demanded.

The stage was set for McHugh, yet she chose the role of the wicked woman.  She could have gained sympathy from a few and less criticism would have been bestowed upon her.  Yet, she is now using the media as a pawn to send messages to those that already carry hate for her.

McHugh is cashing in on the murder of a woman she had a massive role in.  McHugh denies all involvement, whether direct or indirect.  From a public’s point of view both direct or indirect involvement carries the same weight.  The indirect involvement was just as vital in the decision Baden-Clay made that night to murder his wife Allison.  Even though McHugh does not elaborate on what was discussed that night, it is obvious that discussions between her and Baden-Clay led to the murder.

After the trial McHugh was paid over $200,000 to appear on 60 Minutes, stirring the public to fury.

McHugh further alleges that she went into hiding after their affair became public.  That was the right thing to do!  Hide.  She spend her time in hiding, got a new identity, remained quiet.

However at the time when the little girls would have wanted their Dad back, he was sent to prison, and McHugh made a few appearances in the media that only robbed them to mourn the death of their mother and the loss of their father.

McHugh is right, no man will ever look at her with honest intentions.  Her blood money made from the murder and trial will be the only interesting aspect of her morally bankrupt life.

The disregard McHugh shows the family of Allison goes beyond morally bankrupt.  Depleted conscience.  Empty soul.

Karma has no deadline …

Michael Jace called his father-in-law after he shot his wife

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Los Angeles  — Actor Michael Jace, who is charged with killing his wife, called and told his wife’s father about the shooting and asked him to come for the couple’s two young children soon after it happened, an emergency call released Thursday indicates.

In the three-minute call, the father of April Jace told a dispatcher that his son-in-law had called and texted him about the shooting.

“My son-in-law called me, and (texted) me, and said come get the kids because he shot April, our daughter,” the caller, whose name was redacted from the audio, told a fire department dispatcher.

Michael Jace, who played a police officer on the acclaimed TV series The Shield, was arrested on May 19, and police have said he also called police directly to report that he had shot his wife. That police call was not released.

Jace has been charged with murder but has not yet entered a plea.

His father-in-law called police while driving to the Los Angeles home of the couple. By then, police had already been notified of the shooting, according to the audio.

Michael Jace’s attorneys Jason Sias and Jamon Hicks did not comment on the content of the audio but noted that the case is relatively new and they were still investigating.

Motive for shooting not disclosed

“We have the utmost concern for the Jace children,” Sias and Hicks wrote. “Mr. Jace has a constitutional right to a defense. It remains extremely early and we are still in the fact-finding process.”

Police have not disclosed a possible motive for the shooting but previously said they were investigating whether it was prompted by financial difficulties or other marital problems. Michael Jace had filed for bankruptcy in 2011 and had fallen behind on payments to creditors as recently as December.

The family of April Jace released a statement last week calling her death “a senseless act of domestic violence.” The family said it was rallying around April Jace’s three sons, who range in ages from 5 to 18.

April Jace, 40, a financial aid counselor at Biola University, had two sons with her husband, both of whom were at home at the time of her killing. They were uninjured. Her oldest son was from a previous marriage.

Michael Jace also appeared on the show Southland and had small roles in the movies Planet of the ApesBoogie Nights and Forrest Gump.

Credit: www.channel24.co.za

Michael Jace | Judge postpones actor’s arraignment on murder charges to June 18, 2014

An arraignment for actor Michael Jace, who is charged with murder in the shooting death of his wife, was postponed Thursday.

The 51-year-old regular on “The Shield” remained in custody on a charge of murder with a gun during his first appearance in Los Angeles County Superior Court downtown.

Judge Renee Korn moved the arraignment to June 18 at the request of Jace’s attorney and set bail at $2 million.

“He’s doing as well as somebody is that is in custody,” the actor’s attorney, Jason Sias, said outside of the courtroom. “He just wants to see this through.” Jace has been thinking about his two sons, Sias said.

The boys, both of whom are younger than 10, had been inside the couple’s Hyde Park home, where police found the body of April Jace, 40, Monday evening.

The boys were not harmed.  April Jace suffered multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body.

“We just want to express our deepest sympathy to the family,” Sias said.

Mark Robles and his son, Alex Robles, appeared in court to show support for the children. The father and son taught the defendant and his sons jiu-jitsu at their La Mirada studio.

Michael Jace began taking his sons to the martial arts classes a year and a half ago so they could learn how to defend themselves from bullies, Mark Robles said.

Soon after, Michael Jace enrolled in classes, never exhibiting violent tendencies, said Mark Robles, adding that he found the actor who often played cops on TV as “sweet.”

“He was not an aggressive-type at all,” Michael Robles said. “That’s why this seems very out of character.”

The Jaces, he said, “looked like a couple that were in love.”

Crime scene photographs

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CREDIT : http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-michael-jace-arraignment-postponed-20140522-story.html

Aaron Hernandez’s Tattoos May Contain Clues to Murders

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Michael Jace officially charged with his wife’s murder

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Los Angeles  Actor Michael Jace has been formally charged with one count of murder with a gun in the shooting death of his wife, the prosecutor’s spokeswoman said Thursday.

April Jace, 40, died from “multiple gunshot wounds,” according to preliminary autopsy results. The death was ruled a homicide by the Los Angeles County coroner, Deputy Chief Coroner Ed Winter said.

Jace, 51, made his first appearance in a Los Angeles courtroom Thursday afternoon. Bail was set at $2 million, and his arraignment was continued until June 18 at the defense’s request.

“He’s doing as well as somebody who is in custody,” said Jason Sias, Jace’s lawyer. “It’s emotional. He wants to see this through. He’s just thinking about his children.”

Los Angeles police detectives presented their evidence against Jace, who played a Los Angeles cop in TV’s “The Shield,” to the district attorney Thursday morning, according to spokeswoman Jane Robison.

Police found April Jace shot to death in her south Los Angeles home Monday night, Det. Lyman Doster said.

Michael Jace called 911 to report that his wife had been shot, Det. Dean Vinluan said, adding that he “was on the phone with the operator.” Neighbors who heard gunshots also called 911, he said.

“At this moment, the motive of the murder is believed to be domestic violence,” a police statement this week said.

Investigators detained Jace at the couple’s Hyde Park-area home Monday night and booked the actor on a homicide charge early Tuesday, according to Doster.

Two children were in the home when their mother was shot, Vinluan said. The children, whose ages he would not reveal, were taken to a police station and then handed over to a representative of California’s Department of Children and Family Services, he said.

Investigators have found no reports of domestic violence between the husband and wife at their south Los Angeles residence, another LAPD detective said.

A woman described as a close friend of Jace’s first wife said in a sworn statement that she witnessed Jace physically abusing his wife in 1997. The declaration was in court records from Jace’s 2005 custody case concerning his son with Jennifer Bitterman.

Jace “choked and hit” his wife and “slammed her against the wall while (their infant son) screamed in his crib next to her,” Maria De Le Vegas said in the sworn declaration obtained by CNN.

Jace “was raging and out of control, and seeing the extent of his anger was one of the most terrifying things I have ever seen,” she said.

Jace appeared to be suffering severe financial strain in recent years, according to court documents obtained by CNN. The actor filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy in March 2011, citing $500,000 in debts and an annual income of around $80,000 from residuals from his TV and film work, the documents said.

Jace had defaulted on the $411,000 mortgage on the south Los Angeles home where his wife died, according to the documents.

He married April Jace in June 2003, a year after divorcing his first wife, with whom he shared a son who is now a teen.

The FX police drama “The Shield” was the biggest and longest-running role in Jace’s 22-year acting career. He appeared in 89 episodes as Julien Lowe, who started as a rookie officer in an inner-city Los Angeles police precinct in 2002 and rose through the ranks to become a detective before the series ended in 2008, according to the Internet Movie Database.

He acted on several episodes of “Southland,” another TV drama about Los Angeles police, between 2009 and 2012.

Jace often played a law enforcement or military officer on television shows. He is credited with roles in “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation,” “Private Practice,” “The Mentalist,” “Burn Notice” and “NYPD Blue.”

He had the title role of Michael Jordan in the 1999 TV movie about the NBA star, “Michael Jordan: An American Hero.”

Jace played Officer Brown in Russell Crowe’s 2009 film “State of Play,” and he portrayed a Black Panther member in the 1994 blockbuster movie “Forrest Gump.”

April Jace had worked for the past year as a financial aid counselor at Biola University, a private school in La Mirada, California, according to the school.

“We are obviously shocked and saddened by this terrible news, to lose a wonderful colleague, mother and friend,” Biola President Barry Corey said in a written statement.

“April’s radiant personality brought great energy to the financial aid office,” financial aid director Geoff Marsh said. “Her love for helping students and families and her great work ethic earned the respect and love of her coworkers. Her smiling face and helpful spirit will be missed by all.”

Credit: CNN

Trial begins in 2007 death of Glendale officer

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Juan Martinez will be the lead prosecutor in the Bryan Hulsey murder trial.

PHOENIX (AP) — Jury selection began Monday for an Arizona man charged with fatally shooting a police officer seven years ago during a routine traffic stop in Phoenix.

Bryan Wayne Hulsey, 40, is charged with killing Glendale Officer Anthony Holly, 24, during the February 2007 stop.

Hulsey has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder, attempted first-degree murder and misconduct involving a weapon. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.

Attorneys are scheduled to make opening statements June 2. 

The shooting unfolded after a vehicle in which Hulsey was a passenger was pulled over in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale. Hulsey got out of the vehicle and started firing, authorities said. The other officer at the scene returned fire and struck Hulsey in one of his legs.

Prosecutors say Hulsey killed Holly in the exchange of gunfire. Hulsey’s attorneys have questioned whether Holly was unintentionally shot by the other officer.

Defense attorneys made the suggestion about the other officer based on the fact that the bullet that killed Holly wasn’t recovered during the autopsy, though tiny metal fragments remained in his body.

credits: www.trivalleycentral.com

Aaron Hernandez | Indicted for double murder in July 2012.

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BOSTON — Aaron Hernandez ambushed and shot to death two men after a chance encounter inside a Boston nightclub, prosecutors said Thursday as they announced new murder charges against the former NFL star, who was already awaiting trial in another shooting death.

The victims in the 2012 killing, Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado, were shot to death in a car as they waited at a red light on a July night in Boston’s South End neighborhood.

Suffolk District Attorney Daniel Conley would not elaborate on what happened in the nightclub, other than saying that the encounter “triggered a series of events that ended in the murders.” But he said that after the men left, Hernandez followed in an SUV, then pulled up alongside the vehicle and fired multiple shots from a .38-caliber revolver into the passenger’s side, killing de Abreu and Furtado, and wounding a third man. Two other passengers in the car were uninjured.

 Conley said there was no evidence that Hernandez knew the victims prior to that evening.

Weeks after the double shooting, Hernandez signed a five-year deal worth about $40 million with the New England Patriots and went on to play in 12 games that season. A spokesman for the Patriots said the team had no comment.

Hernandez is already awaiting trial in the June 2013 shooting death of 27-year-old Odin Lloyd near Hernandez’s North Attleborough home and is being held without bail after pleading not guilty to murder in Lloyd’s death.

“Under our system of justice, Aaron Hernandez is innocent of these charges, and he looks forward to his day in court,” said his lawyers, Charles Rankin and James Sultan, in a statement. Alluding to a news conference held by Conley to announce the charges, the attorneys said they would not try the case in the media.

Conley said the investigation of the Boston killings moved forward after the Lloyd case, which will be tried separately in another Massachusetts court. He noted the discovery in Bristol, Connecticut, of the car Hernandez was driving the night the men died and the recovery of the alleged murder weapon from an unnamed person with ties to Hernandez.

Conley declined to say whether authorities suspected any connection between the Boston and North Attleborough shootings.

Hernandez is charged with two counts of first-degree murder and three counts of armed assault with intent to murder, as well as unlawful possession of the gun used in the attack.

Conley said the notoriety surrounding the former tight end played no role in the way the case was investigated.

“This was never about Aaron Hernandez. This case was about two victims who were stopped, ambushed and senselessly murdered on the streets they called home,” he said.

Tanya Singleton, Hernandez’s cousin, was charged with criminal contempt of court in the indictment returned by a Suffolk County grand jury. Singleton was given immunity to testify before the grand jury but refused, Conley said.

A message left with Singleton’s lawyer was not immediately returned.

Families of the victims have filed civil lawsuits in February against Hernandez seeking $6 million for the wrongful deaths of the two men.

He is expected to be arraigned on the new charges in Suffolk County Superior Court next week.

Hernandez was cut by the Patriots hours after his arrest in the Lloyd case, and coach Bill Belichick later said he was “shocked and disappointed” upon learning of the criminal investigation.

Thursday’s indictment raises the possibility that Hernandez played the 2012 NFL season after killing the two men.

Six weeks after allegedly committing the murders in July 2012, Hernandez received the lucrative contract extension from the Patriots and talked about being inspired by his family to make smart decisions.

“I called [my family] and told them obviously what the contract was, and the basics about it,” he said at the team’s annual charity gala on Aug. 27, 2012. “They were all crying. I was crying right with them. This is probably one of the best days of my life. I’ll remember this day forever. I just hope I keep going, doing the right things, making the right decisions so I can have a good life, and be there to live a good life with my family.”

Upon receiving the deal, Hernandez donated $50,000 to a fund Patriots owner Robert Kraft set up to honor his late wife, Myra, and told reporters he would “live life as a Patriot.”

“[Kraft] didn’t need to give me the amount that he gave me, and knowing that he thinks I deserve that, he trusts me to make the right decisions, it means a lot,” Hernandez said then. “It means he trusts my character, and the person I am, which means a lot, because my mother, that’s how she wanted to raise me.

“They have to trust you to give you that money. I just feel a lot of respect and I owe it back to him. Not only is it $50,000 … it’s more, I have a lot more to give back, and all I can do is play my heart out for them, make the right decisions, and live life as a Patriot.”

Also Thursday, Ernest Wallace, an associate of Hernandez, pleaded not guilty to murder in the shooting death of Lloyd.

Credit: espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:10936421

Aaron Hernandez – hardcore drugs and about to be kicked of the team.

Aaron Hernandez

http://global.christianpost.com/news/aaron-hernandez-update-player-was-using-hardcore-drugs-on-verge-of-being-cut-from-team-103198/

Aaron Hernandez was allegedly using hardcore drugs and had long since cut ties to family and team-mates in exchange for gang members prior to his arrest for the murder of Odin Lloyd, Rolling Stone reporter Paul Solotaroff claims.

The detailed report, titled “Gansgter in the Huddle” claims that Hernandez’s life prior to his arrest for murder was far from just a New England Patriots tight end drafted in 2012. His contract with the team was extended for five years last August, but over the last year, Solotaroff alleged that Hernandez’s personality drastically changed.

After conducting detailed interviews, Solotaroff said that Hernandez had become increasingly paranoid over the past year and was actively using the hardcore drug phencyclidine, which is often shortened to PCP or called “angel dust.” The drug is known for its hallucinogenic effects and paranoia, which allegedly caused Hernandez to surround himself with gang members and cut off friends, family and teammates.

“Instead of teammates, Hernandez built a cohort of thugs, bringing stone-cold gangsters over to the house to play pool, smoke chronic and carouse,” Solotaroff wrote.

Solotaroff’s report also alleged that Hernandez had “missed so many practices” and committed so many “thug life stunts” that he was already on the verge of being cut from the team prior to the search of the player’s home. However, team owner Robert Kraft claimed he had no knowledge of Hernandez’s criminal past, describing the player as a “most likeable young man” during a Sports Illustrated interview.

Referring to Hernandez’s poor behavior as a secret that the player kept well, Kraft said “if this stuff is true, then I’ve been duped and our whole organization has been duped.”

“I never saw him with them,” John Hevesy, Hernandez’s position coach while he was on the Florida Gators, said of the alleged gang member buddies, “but misery attracts misery: There’s vultures waiting to swoop.”

Solotaroff also accused former University of Florida Coach Urban Meyer of “[helping to] cover up failed drug tests, along with two violent incidents — an assault and a drive-by shootout outside a local bar” while Hernandez was on the team.

Hernandez was formerly indicted with charges on Aug. 22 for the first-degree-murder of Odin Lloyd. The player’s arraignment has been scheduled for Sept. 6 where he will plead “guilty” or “not guilty.”

Read more at http://global.christianpost.com/news/aaron-hernandez-update-player-was-using-hardcore-drugs-on-verge-of-being-cut-from-team-103198/#t8MGxUyKpWa55iKM.99

Odin Lloyd ~ His life before fatally shot, Aaron Hernandes arrested.

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All credits ::: http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/9440598/aaron-hernandez-odin-lloyd-connected-life-death

On a recent summer Sunday in inner-city Boston, Odin Lloyd dreamed about his future. He was at a cookout with Darryl Hodge, a friend he was so close to they called each other the Wolf Pack, a man who, like Lloyd, had boyhood hopes of playing in the NFL. But now here they were, years later, playing semipro football in empty old stadiums with beat-up bodies and paycheck-to-paycheck jobs.

Imagine, Lloyd told his friend, what life would be like if they could wake up every day doing something they loved. If they had the money to take care of everybody — family, friends — and fly anywhere they wanted on a vacation.

“I was like, ‘Bro, we know it, we’ve just got to do better overall,'” Hodge recalled. “‘Get better jobs. We should be living like that.’ That was the mission.”

They never really talked like this, Hodge said. But Lloyd was 27 years old and starting to think about these things, most likely because he was hanging out with New England Patriotstight end Aaron Hernandez.

His relationship with Hernandez had given Lloyd a glimpse of the life he’d dreamed of. Not only was Hernandez playing football for money — for millions — he was on the team Lloyd loved. Hernandez used to get him tickets to Patriots games. On at least one occasion, Hernandez, according to one of Lloyd’s friends, had dropped $10,000 on a night of clubbing with Lloyd, and of course Lloyd couldn’t believe it. Hernandez had promised Lloyd he’d fly him to California for a vacation. You’ve got to see Cali, he told him. Lloyd, who was working at a landscaping company, had never been there, Hodge said.

On the night of June 16, Lloyd was driving a shiny, black Chevy Suburban that Hernandez had rented for him. Hernandez, according to Hodge, told Lloyd he could keep it until Monday. Lloyd seemed always to be smiling, but his grin was even wider that weekend when he was behind the wheel of the SUV. Since he didn’t have a car of his own, Lloyd pedaled his bike to work. He put a positive spin on his transportation issues, figuring the extra exercise would give him an edge on the field with the semipro Boston Bandits. But then Lloyd pulled up in the Suburban that Saturday, the night the Bandits had a scrimmage, and the team was impressed. “Nice car,” they told him. Bandits assistant coach Mike Branch did a double-take. “I looked at him like, ‘Odin’ — excuse my language — ‘but whose f—ing car is that?'” Branch said.

Lloyd was star-struck — “Who wouldn’t be?” Branch said — but didn’t brag about his friendship with Hernandez. They had met sometime in the past two years through Lloyd’s girlfriend, Shaneah Jenkins, the sister of Hernandez’s fiancée, Shayanna. When someone would ask about the football player with the $40 million contract, Lloyd simply told his friends that Hernandez was a cool guy.

That night of June 16, Lloyd was supposed to watch Game 5 of the NBA Finals with Hodge. Lloyd would not root for the Miami Heat; as a Bostonian, that seemed treasonous. Sometime before the game, Lloyd’s old Blackberry jangled with a message from his boss, who said Lloyd had landscape work to do on Monday. So he grabbed some leftover barbecue and took Hodge home in the SUV.

They were about to say goodbye around 9 p.m. when Lloyd got a text. The person on the other end asked if he wanted to hang out. And then Lloyd said he might go out after all, and Hodge went home to watch the basketball game.

Days later, the barbecue Hodge’s cousin had packed up for Lloyd still sat in Lloyd’s refrigerator. “He was supposed to be at home eating,” Hodge said. “Not out and about.”

The future that Odin Lloyd dreamily talked about lasted less than 10 hours. At roughly 3:30 a.m. on June 17, Lloyd was shot five times in the chest and back. Aaron Hernandez is now sitting in the Bristol County (Mass.) House of Corrections, charged with first-degree murder and five gun-related offenses. He is being held without bail.

As the story of two men with similar dreams but completely different lives continues to unfold, all that the people close to Lloyd have are grief and questions. Why would Hernandez, who seemingly had everything, do something that would cause him to lose it all? Why, if he is guilty of killing Lloyd, would he leave the body in an industrial area less than a mile from his mansion? Why would Lloyd get into a Nissan Altima with Hernandez at roughly 2:30 a.m., only hours before he was supposed to work? Did he know he was in danger?

Mike Branch, who coached Lloyd in high school and adulthood, has been tossing and turning over these questions for more than a week.

“Those thoughts are going through my head,” Branch said. “‘Odin, if you felt fear, why did you get in the car?’

“It had to be trust, man.”