Tag Archives: Aaron Hernandez

Aaron Hernandez | Judge denies combining contempt charges for Hernandez’s cousin

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FALL RIVER, Mass. –  The cousin of former Patriot Aaron Hernandez was denied a motion in court to combine charges from two different court cases, in two different counties.

Lawyers for Tanya Singleton argued the issue in court Tuesday. Singleton has been charged with criminal contempt in both Bristol and Suffolk Counties. Prosecutors say the 38-year-old refused to testify before Grand Juries in the murder of Odin Lloyd and in a 2012 double murder in Boston. Both of which Hernandez is accused of being involved in.

Earlier this month, Singleton’s lawyer indicated his client would be changing her pleas to guilty, over concerns about her battle with breast cancer.

She will be in court to change her plea in Bristol County on August 19.

Source: http://www.myfoxboston.com/

Aaron Hernandez’s Tattoos May Contain Clues to Murders

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Carol Coronado | Charged with murder of her 3 daughters – A possible Death Penalty case

coronadoCarol Coronado, a California mother of three little girls has been charged with their stabbing murders.  

She’s also been charged with the attempted murder of her mother. Authorities say Coronado attacked her mother when she confronted her. 

Carol Coronado was still hospitalized Thursday at Torrance Memorial Medical Center, where she received treatment for self-inflicted stab wounds.

She suffered wounds over her body, but most were considered scratches. Her most significant wound was to the upper chest, but it was not severe enough to be considered life-threatening, detectives said.

 She’s scheduled to be taken into the hospital jail ward.

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The Crime Scene

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department was called around 5.10 pm Tuesday when they responded to the 1000 block of West 23rd Street.

Carol Coronado’s husband, Rudy, was outside working on his pick-up truck parked across the street from their home.  When his mother-in-law, Julie Piercey, arrived about 5 p.m, he told her to go ahead and go inside.

Moments later Julie Piercey ran out of the small, white house, with a bloody knife in her hand.  She screamed at her son-in-law and frantically began dialling her cellphone.

“She killed the babies,” she said.

Julie made a horrifying discovery, when she found the children’s lifeless bodies inside the house.

Carol Coronado allegedly turned the knife on Ms Piercey when she confronted Coronado.  Piercey grabbed the kitchen knife from the mother’s hand.

Moments later, Rudy rushed inside when he heard her screams of “Oh my God!”

He screamed when he saw the bloody scene inside his home.

“He kept saying, ‘Oh my God, Oh my god,’ ”  neighbor Veronica Ruiz said.

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Authorities found the bodies of 2-1/2-year-old Sophia, 16-month-old Yazmine and 2-month-old Xenia laid out on a bed after they were stabbed, Lt. Dave Coleman told the media  “The way the injuries occurred, they weren’t sleeping. She lined them up on the bed. They were neatly placed on the bed.”
Carol Coronado was near the bed where her 3 daughters were arranged on it in a pool of blood. Carol was covered in blood herself and had self-inflicted stab wounds.   Knives and a hammer were at the crime scene near the bodies. 
Coronado was found naked, covered in blood and holding a knife according to police.

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Neighbors watched as deputies escorted her from the house, handcuffed and wrapped in a blanket.

“She had a zoned-out look and was just looking down,” Ashley Madrid, 27, said. “She had dry blood smeared on her face and legs.”

 Charges

Carol Ann Coronado, 30, was charged with three counts of murder and one count of attempted murder Friday.  The attempted murder charge stems from Coronado attacking her own mother, Julie Piercey.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office will decide later whether to seek the death penalty.

It is unclear whether prosecutors would seek the Death Penalty.

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Autopsy

Autopsies conducted Thursday confirmed the children suffered stab wounds, but it was unclear whether they also suffered head trauma. The results were not disclosed.  A hammer and other knives were confiscated from the home to examine as potential evidence.

“The way the injuries occurred, they weren’t sleeping,” sheriff’s homicide Lt. Dave Coleman said. “She lined them up on the bed. They were neatly placed on the bed.”

“Placement of the girls’ bodies occurred after they were killed”, he said.

Family Reaction

Carol’s husband Rudy Coronado told a reporter that she must have been possessed by a demon.  

Their godfather, John Carrion, also said a demon was inside Coronado the day that the girls died.

“Pray for that woman. She had a demon inside her that day.”

He says he never saw Carol upset or angry:

“I don’t know how I feel about the woman right now.  I don’t understand what was going on in that woman’s head.”

Carrion says the father  is too overcome with grief to talk with anyone and Rudy is  “dazed and confused.”  

The godfather goes on to say:   “Right now, he’s giving her the benefit of doubt.  He just said he didn’t believe he saw Carol — he saw a demon inside her.  He said he doesn’t blame Carol. He blames the … demon.”

Sandra Coronado, Rudy’s sister told the media  “He says that there’s something in her that he didn’t see.  Something in her eyes.  I don’t know.”

“Never in a million years would I have thought anything like this,” the sister-in-law said.

Sandra Coronado said she never saw any demons inside her sister-in-law, but thought she lacked a “mother’s instinct.”

“Personally, I don’t have my kids spend the night nowhere,” she said. “Her,  it was like, ‘Fine,  go ahead and take them.’  She would let my cousin take them for like a week.  She would keep the baby.  She would say she was tired. She had to do homework.  She had to clean house.”

Carol Coronado, who was taking classes on the Internet, stayed at home with the children while her husband went out early each day to sell car parts at the Alpine Village swap meets.

She kept a cluttered home, which triggered some discord with her husband.

“I believe that was their main issue,” the sister-in-law said. “My brother wanted the house clean for his girls. He wanted to come home to a home-cooked meal.”

Carol Coronado, then Carol Piercey, met her husband in their Carson-area neighborhood. They married in 2011 near the Korean Bell in Angels Gate Park in San Pedro.

“It was beautiful,” the sister-in-law said. “My kids were the ring bearers.”

Coleman described the family’s home as a former workshop or “converted garage.” It opened to a common area and a kitchenette with a bedroom.

Coronado’s father-in-law said she was “trying to go to school and take care of the kids.”

“It’s real bad,” Rudy Coronado, 67, said.  Carol Coronado’s husband is also called Rudy.

“Right now, he’s giving her the benefit of doubt,” Carrion said. “He just said he didn’t believe he saw Carol — he saw a demon inside her. He said he doesn’t blame Carol. He blames the … demon.”

Carrion declined to speak further about the children’s’ mother, saying only that he had never seen her angry.

“I don’t know how I feel about the woman right now,” he said. “I don’t understand what was going on in that woman’s head.”

 How the day unfolded

Earlier in the day, Carol called her mother in the morning saying she felt like she was  “going crazy”.  

Sandra Coronado said she placed the call to her sister-in-law about 9am Tuesday, she didn’t question why, but made the call.

According to Sandra “All she said was, ‘You need to call Carol.  I’m at work.  I can’t talk to her right now,’ ” the sister-in law said. “If (Carol) told her that she was going crazy, she should have told me that.  She never even mentioned that.  If she would have told me that, things would have been different.”

Carol Coronado told Sandra she was tired and exhausted and planned to take her second oldest daughter to the doctor on the day.  Sandra offered to take care of the other two girls while Carol was out.

“She was sobbing,  she was crying.  And she said she was tired and exhausted. … I told her,  ‘Take her to the appointment and bring me the girls.’ ”

 Sandra Coronado said she heard her nieces crying in the background, but didn’t think anything of it. A mother herself, she knows children often cry when a parent is on the telephone.

Behind the crime

Carol Coronado had never been reported to the Department of Children and Family Services.  Investigators are looking into whether she might have been on drugs or suffering from postpartum depression.  Mental health experts can’t comment on the specifics of the case, because there is still so little information. But Phillip Resnick, the director of forensic psychiatry at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, told the media that it can be difficult for women suffering from postpartum depression or mental health issues to get help: “A woman may be so ashamed she won’t reveal problems to a doctor. They won’t reveal thoughts of killing their children, because they’re fearful a social worker will take their children away.”

Carol Coronado served in the Army for a short time over 10 years ago and had to leave because of medical reasons.  She was taking online classes while staying home with the kids.

Relatives said that the couple fought about housekeeping. Carol would ask relatives to watch her girls from time-to-time, so she could clean the house and do homework.   Sandra Coronado told the media, “My brother wanted the house clean for his girls.   He wanted to come home to a home-cooked meal.”

Those who know the family said there was no indication that anything was wrong.  Coronado often took the girls on walks up and down the street, a neighbor said.   Her Facebook page featured several photos of the girls, including an ultrasound photo.

 Funeral, Vigil and Fundraising

Outside the home, relatives assembled a small memorial of flowers, candles and teddy bears. On Wednesday evening, several dozen people attended a vigil for the slain girls, including their father. Surrounded by relatives and friends, he cried and rubbed the photos of his three daughters.

At a vigil Wednesday night outside his home, Rudy Coronado broke down. He collapsed to the ground on his knees, bent over and cried next to a memorial of flowers, candles and teddy bears.  Relatives stroked his back and head.
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The girls, Carrion said, were energetic and loved the Disney movie “Frozen.” There were plans for a baptism this fall.

“They were the most beautiful babies you had ever seen,” he said. “They loved their daddy and he loved them. Pray for my babies, please, pray for my babies. Pray for Rudy. And even pray for that woman.”

 Family members spent the afternoon Thursday making funeral arrangements for the girls and planning fundraisers to pay for the services. A distraught Rudy Coronado cried when he signed papers at the funeral home. 

 Money also was an issue for the young couple. Faced with funeral expenses, family members have scheduled car washes and bake sales to raise funds Saturday and Sunday at Henry’s Market at Avalon Boulevard and 184th Street. A car show, and fundraisers at the House of Blues in Los Angeles, Alpine Village near Carson, and Buffalo Wild Wings are also in the works. And an online fundraiser was established on Gofundme.com under the title “Our 3 little angels.”

Aaron Hernandez | Indicted for double murder in July 2012.

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BOSTON — Aaron Hernandez ambushed and shot to death two men after a chance encounter inside a Boston nightclub, prosecutors said Thursday as they announced new murder charges against the former NFL star, who was already awaiting trial in another shooting death.

The victims in the 2012 killing, Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado, were shot to death in a car as they waited at a red light on a July night in Boston’s South End neighborhood.

Suffolk District Attorney Daniel Conley would not elaborate on what happened in the nightclub, other than saying that the encounter “triggered a series of events that ended in the murders.” But he said that after the men left, Hernandez followed in an SUV, then pulled up alongside the vehicle and fired multiple shots from a .38-caliber revolver into the passenger’s side, killing de Abreu and Furtado, and wounding a third man. Two other passengers in the car were uninjured.

 Conley said there was no evidence that Hernandez knew the victims prior to that evening.

Weeks after the double shooting, Hernandez signed a five-year deal worth about $40 million with the New England Patriots and went on to play in 12 games that season. A spokesman for the Patriots said the team had no comment.

Hernandez is already awaiting trial in the June 2013 shooting death of 27-year-old Odin Lloyd near Hernandez’s North Attleborough home and is being held without bail after pleading not guilty to murder in Lloyd’s death.

“Under our system of justice, Aaron Hernandez is innocent of these charges, and he looks forward to his day in court,” said his lawyers, Charles Rankin and James Sultan, in a statement. Alluding to a news conference held by Conley to announce the charges, the attorneys said they would not try the case in the media.

Conley said the investigation of the Boston killings moved forward after the Lloyd case, which will be tried separately in another Massachusetts court. He noted the discovery in Bristol, Connecticut, of the car Hernandez was driving the night the men died and the recovery of the alleged murder weapon from an unnamed person with ties to Hernandez.

Conley declined to say whether authorities suspected any connection between the Boston and North Attleborough shootings.

Hernandez is charged with two counts of first-degree murder and three counts of armed assault with intent to murder, as well as unlawful possession of the gun used in the attack.

Conley said the notoriety surrounding the former tight end played no role in the way the case was investigated.

“This was never about Aaron Hernandez. This case was about two victims who were stopped, ambushed and senselessly murdered on the streets they called home,” he said.

Tanya Singleton, Hernandez’s cousin, was charged with criminal contempt of court in the indictment returned by a Suffolk County grand jury. Singleton was given immunity to testify before the grand jury but refused, Conley said.

A message left with Singleton’s lawyer was not immediately returned.

Families of the victims have filed civil lawsuits in February against Hernandez seeking $6 million for the wrongful deaths of the two men.

He is expected to be arraigned on the new charges in Suffolk County Superior Court next week.

Hernandez was cut by the Patriots hours after his arrest in the Lloyd case, and coach Bill Belichick later said he was “shocked and disappointed” upon learning of the criminal investigation.

Thursday’s indictment raises the possibility that Hernandez played the 2012 NFL season after killing the two men.

Six weeks after allegedly committing the murders in July 2012, Hernandez received the lucrative contract extension from the Patriots and talked about being inspired by his family to make smart decisions.

“I called [my family] and told them obviously what the contract was, and the basics about it,” he said at the team’s annual charity gala on Aug. 27, 2012. “They were all crying. I was crying right with them. This is probably one of the best days of my life. I’ll remember this day forever. I just hope I keep going, doing the right things, making the right decisions so I can have a good life, and be there to live a good life with my family.”

Upon receiving the deal, Hernandez donated $50,000 to a fund Patriots owner Robert Kraft set up to honor his late wife, Myra, and told reporters he would “live life as a Patriot.”

“[Kraft] didn’t need to give me the amount that he gave me, and knowing that he thinks I deserve that, he trusts me to make the right decisions, it means a lot,” Hernandez said then. “It means he trusts my character, and the person I am, which means a lot, because my mother, that’s how she wanted to raise me.

“They have to trust you to give you that money. I just feel a lot of respect and I owe it back to him. Not only is it $50,000 … it’s more, I have a lot more to give back, and all I can do is play my heart out for them, make the right decisions, and live life as a Patriot.”

Also Thursday, Ernest Wallace, an associate of Hernandez, pleaded not guilty to murder in the shooting death of Lloyd.

Credit: espn.go.com/video/clip?id=espn:10936421

Aaron Hernandez – hardcore drugs and about to be kicked of the team.

Aaron Hernandez

http://global.christianpost.com/news/aaron-hernandez-update-player-was-using-hardcore-drugs-on-verge-of-being-cut-from-team-103198/

Aaron Hernandez was allegedly using hardcore drugs and had long since cut ties to family and team-mates in exchange for gang members prior to his arrest for the murder of Odin Lloyd, Rolling Stone reporter Paul Solotaroff claims.

The detailed report, titled “Gansgter in the Huddle” claims that Hernandez’s life prior to his arrest for murder was far from just a New England Patriots tight end drafted in 2012. His contract with the team was extended for five years last August, but over the last year, Solotaroff alleged that Hernandez’s personality drastically changed.

After conducting detailed interviews, Solotaroff said that Hernandez had become increasingly paranoid over the past year and was actively using the hardcore drug phencyclidine, which is often shortened to PCP or called “angel dust.” The drug is known for its hallucinogenic effects and paranoia, which allegedly caused Hernandez to surround himself with gang members and cut off friends, family and teammates.

“Instead of teammates, Hernandez built a cohort of thugs, bringing stone-cold gangsters over to the house to play pool, smoke chronic and carouse,” Solotaroff wrote.

Solotaroff’s report also alleged that Hernandez had “missed so many practices” and committed so many “thug life stunts” that he was already on the verge of being cut from the team prior to the search of the player’s home. However, team owner Robert Kraft claimed he had no knowledge of Hernandez’s criminal past, describing the player as a “most likeable young man” during a Sports Illustrated interview.

Referring to Hernandez’s poor behavior as a secret that the player kept well, Kraft said “if this stuff is true, then I’ve been duped and our whole organization has been duped.”

“I never saw him with them,” John Hevesy, Hernandez’s position coach while he was on the Florida Gators, said of the alleged gang member buddies, “but misery attracts misery: There’s vultures waiting to swoop.”

Solotaroff also accused former University of Florida Coach Urban Meyer of “[helping to] cover up failed drug tests, along with two violent incidents — an assault and a drive-by shootout outside a local bar” while Hernandez was on the team.

Hernandez was formerly indicted with charges on Aug. 22 for the first-degree-murder of Odin Lloyd. The player’s arraignment has been scheduled for Sept. 6 where he will plead “guilty” or “not guilty.”

Read more at http://global.christianpost.com/news/aaron-hernandez-update-player-was-using-hardcore-drugs-on-verge-of-being-cut-from-team-103198/#t8MGxUyKpWa55iKM.99

Aaron Hernandez arraignment set fAaron Hernandezor Friday, September 6.

Aaron Hernandez

Odin Lloyd texted his sister in the wee hours of June 17.

“NFL. Just so you know.”

At the time, according to prosecutors, Lloyd was in a silver Nissan Altima with Aaron Hernandez, a star tight end with the NFL’s New England Patriots, and two other people.

About 3:25 a.m. — two minutes after the message went out — gunshots shattered the quiet night in a southeastern Massachusetts industrial park, according to witnesses.

Not five minutes passed before a surveillance camera at his North Attleborough home captured video of Hernandez carrying what appears to be a gun, prosecutors said. Lloyd lay dead about a mile away.

The video is among the evidence prosecutors are gathering in their case against Hernandez, 23, who is set to be arraigned Friday.

Let go by the Patriots, Hernandez will step into a courtroom for the sixth time since his June 26 arrest.

He’s expected to formally plead not guilty to first-degree murder in the death of Lloyd, a 27-year-old semipro football player.

“He’s bearing up under the pressure,” defense attorney Michael Fee said when Hernandez was indicted last month. “He understands what’s in front of him, and he’s committed to clearing his name.”

Fee has told reporters that the case against his client, who is being held without bond, is circumstantial. “There’s an incredible rush to judgment in this case,” according to the attorney.

For his part, according to a TMZ report last month, Hernandez declared his innocence as he responded to a fan letter, saying that “all the people who turned on me will feel like crap.”

Investigation continues in another case

Friday’s arraignment comes as authorities continue to investigate Hernandez in connection with an unsolved 2012 double homicide case in Boston.

Investigators have obtained July 2012 video surveillance allegedly showing Hernandez at a nightclub at the same time as two men who were fatally shot that night, according to a law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation.

The video apparently does not show Hernandez interacting with Daniel Abreu, 29, and Safiro Furtado, 28, according to a law enforcement source. The development was first reported Wednesday by the Hartford Courant.

Boston police have said the men were inside a BMW sprayed with gunfire after they left the nightclub.

Law enforcement sources said they believe Hernandez rented a silver SUV with Rhode Island registration that was linked to the scene of the double homicide.

After Lloyd’s murder, Bristol, Connecticut police discovered the vehicle by accident while searching the garage of Hernandez’s uncle, a law enforcement source told CNN.

Boston police had been looking for the vehicle for almost a year, law enforcement sources added.

Hernandez has not been charged in the unsolved double shooting.

His attorneys have previously declined to comment to CNN when asked about the ongoing Boston investigation.

Defense: Jury will find him ‘innocent’

A Bristol County, Massachusetts, grand jury last month indicted Hernandez on a first-degree murder and five weapons charges.

Prosecutors say Hernandez orchestrated the shooting of his friend Lloyd, who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee.

Fee said he was pleased with the indictment because it gave his client “a path to trial,” and that a jury will find Hernandez “innocent.”

Police have not located the gun believed to have been used in the Lloyd killing.

But prosecutors say Hernandez returned a rental car with a bullet casing that allegedly matched bullets found at the scene.

Surveillance cameras showed the car believed to be carrying Hernandez and the others at the industrial park, according to authorities.

Hernandez has been sitting in a jail cell as his former team, known for its stellar offense, contends for another Super Bowl title. The Patriots open their regular season Sunday against the Buffalo Bills.

In his letter to the fan, as reported by TMZ, the fallen NFL star said the world makes things “out of false accusations” and that he will be exonerated.

“I know there is a reason I’m going thru this and I will figure it out through.”

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/06/justice/aaron-hernandez-arraignment/

CNN’s Laura Dolan, Lorenzo Ferrigno, Greg Botelho and Laura Ly and HLN’s Amanda Sloane contributed to this report.

Odin Lloyd ~ His life before fatally shot, Aaron Hernandes arrested.

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All credits ::: http://espn.go.com/espn/otl/story/_/id/9440598/aaron-hernandez-odin-lloyd-connected-life-death

On a recent summer Sunday in inner-city Boston, Odin Lloyd dreamed about his future. He was at a cookout with Darryl Hodge, a friend he was so close to they called each other the Wolf Pack, a man who, like Lloyd, had boyhood hopes of playing in the NFL. But now here they were, years later, playing semipro football in empty old stadiums with beat-up bodies and paycheck-to-paycheck jobs.

Imagine, Lloyd told his friend, what life would be like if they could wake up every day doing something they loved. If they had the money to take care of everybody — family, friends — and fly anywhere they wanted on a vacation.

“I was like, ‘Bro, we know it, we’ve just got to do better overall,'” Hodge recalled. “‘Get better jobs. We should be living like that.’ That was the mission.”

They never really talked like this, Hodge said. But Lloyd was 27 years old and starting to think about these things, most likely because he was hanging out with New England Patriotstight end Aaron Hernandez.

His relationship with Hernandez had given Lloyd a glimpse of the life he’d dreamed of. Not only was Hernandez playing football for money — for millions — he was on the team Lloyd loved. Hernandez used to get him tickets to Patriots games. On at least one occasion, Hernandez, according to one of Lloyd’s friends, had dropped $10,000 on a night of clubbing with Lloyd, and of course Lloyd couldn’t believe it. Hernandez had promised Lloyd he’d fly him to California for a vacation. You’ve got to see Cali, he told him. Lloyd, who was working at a landscaping company, had never been there, Hodge said.

On the night of June 16, Lloyd was driving a shiny, black Chevy Suburban that Hernandez had rented for him. Hernandez, according to Hodge, told Lloyd he could keep it until Monday. Lloyd seemed always to be smiling, but his grin was even wider that weekend when he was behind the wheel of the SUV. Since he didn’t have a car of his own, Lloyd pedaled his bike to work. He put a positive spin on his transportation issues, figuring the extra exercise would give him an edge on the field with the semipro Boston Bandits. But then Lloyd pulled up in the Suburban that Saturday, the night the Bandits had a scrimmage, and the team was impressed. “Nice car,” they told him. Bandits assistant coach Mike Branch did a double-take. “I looked at him like, ‘Odin’ — excuse my language — ‘but whose f—ing car is that?'” Branch said.

Lloyd was star-struck — “Who wouldn’t be?” Branch said — but didn’t brag about his friendship with Hernandez. They had met sometime in the past two years through Lloyd’s girlfriend, Shaneah Jenkins, the sister of Hernandez’s fiancée, Shayanna. When someone would ask about the football player with the $40 million contract, Lloyd simply told his friends that Hernandez was a cool guy.

That night of June 16, Lloyd was supposed to watch Game 5 of the NBA Finals with Hodge. Lloyd would not root for the Miami Heat; as a Bostonian, that seemed treasonous. Sometime before the game, Lloyd’s old Blackberry jangled with a message from his boss, who said Lloyd had landscape work to do on Monday. So he grabbed some leftover barbecue and took Hodge home in the SUV.

They were about to say goodbye around 9 p.m. when Lloyd got a text. The person on the other end asked if he wanted to hang out. And then Lloyd said he might go out after all, and Hodge went home to watch the basketball game.

Days later, the barbecue Hodge’s cousin had packed up for Lloyd still sat in Lloyd’s refrigerator. “He was supposed to be at home eating,” Hodge said. “Not out and about.”

The future that Odin Lloyd dreamily talked about lasted less than 10 hours. At roughly 3:30 a.m. on June 17, Lloyd was shot five times in the chest and back. Aaron Hernandez is now sitting in the Bristol County (Mass.) House of Corrections, charged with first-degree murder and five gun-related offenses. He is being held without bail.

As the story of two men with similar dreams but completely different lives continues to unfold, all that the people close to Lloyd have are grief and questions. Why would Hernandez, who seemingly had everything, do something that would cause him to lose it all? Why, if he is guilty of killing Lloyd, would he leave the body in an industrial area less than a mile from his mansion? Why would Lloyd get into a Nissan Altima with Hernandez at roughly 2:30 a.m., only hours before he was supposed to work? Did he know he was in danger?

Mike Branch, who coached Lloyd in high school and adulthood, has been tossing and turning over these questions for more than a week.

“Those thoughts are going through my head,” Branch said. “‘Odin, if you felt fear, why did you get in the car?’

“It had to be trust, man.”